Wood Works

There are around 37,000 churches in England.

…………………..Of these, only 27 are timber-framed.

Warburton St Werbergh

Warburgtune (as it was recorded in the Domesday record) has two churches and both are dedicated to St Werbergh. It’s an unusual dedication more commonly seen around East Anglia where the remains of the Abbess of Ely were first interred. The remains were subsequently moved to the abbey of St Peter and St Paul in Chester, which was later rededicated to St Werburgh.
The newer building is the current parish church and was built in the mid 1880’s because the older church was in need of repair. Some of the contents of the old church were transferred to the new one. Despite this, the necessary repairs were completed in 1884 before the new church was actually finished.
Warburton Old church is one of the 27 timber-framed examples and remains a consecrated building (though officially redundant since the 1970’s).

Standing within a three-quarter circle of mature yew trees the churchyard and Grade I listed church are a small oasis of tranquility.

As well as the main timber frame there is some timber framing with wattle and daub infilling in the north wall. The other walls are of sandstone or brick. The tower, unusually at the East end, and hearse house are built from brick

 

Warburton St Werbergh

 

The lych gate, built in 1887, is Grade II listed.

Warburton St Werbergh

Warburton St Werbergh

 

 

The benifice of Warburton was jointly held with Oughtrington, St Peter.