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Almost sunset

With the prospect of a colourful sunset Ewan and I set off for North Wales. Plan A was to go to Talacre Lighthouse but plan B went into operation when I realsied we had plenty of time to get to Llandudno Bay or maybe further. We arrived in Caernarfon and parked up next to the castle then strolled over the bridge to get a better view over towards Anglesey. Another photographer had the same idea and I spent some time chatting to him whilst Ewan took photos of the bridge and moon. The orange glow was lighting the castle.

Caernarfon castle in the evening light

Caernarfon castle in the evening light

Looking the other way towards the setting sun there was very little moisture in the air to give a full spectrum of colours but the oranges made the scene look quite tropical.

Anglesey Sunset

Anglesey Sunset

The tide was an hour or so away from high tide and the breeze making it lap gently on the shingle. Soon the sun was all but gone but we were in no rush to leave.

Anglesey Sunset

Anglesey Sunset

 

Time for a few photos of the castle and harbour though the wind was getting stronger and a lot cooler.

Caernarfon castle at night

Caernarfon castle at night

Caernarfon harbour at night.

Caernarfon harbour at night.

 

Quite a lot of driving for a short time walking and taking photographs but the effort was rewarded with some good images unspoilt by the summer crowds.

Wood Works

There are around 37,000 churches in England.

…………………..Of these, only 27 are timber-framed.

Warburton St Werbergh

Warburgtune (as it was recorded in the Domesday record) has two churches and both are dedicated to St Werbergh. It’s an unusual dedication more commonly seen around East Anglia where the remains of the Abbess of Ely were first interred. The remains were subsequently moved to the abbey of St Peter and St Paul in Chester, which was later rededicated to St Werburgh.
The newer building is the current parish church and was built in the mid 1880’s because the older church was in need of repair. Some of the contents of the old church were transferred to the new one. Despite this, the necessary repairs were completed in 1884 before the new church was actually finished.
Warburton Old church is one of the 27 timber-framed examples and remains a consecrated building (though officially redundant since the 1970’s).

Standing within a three-quarter circle of mature yew trees the churchyard and Grade I listed church are a small oasis of tranquility.

As well as the main timber frame there is some timber framing with wattle and daub infilling in the north wall. The other walls are of sandstone or brick. The tower, unusually at the East end, and hearse house are built from brick

 

Warburton St Werbergh

 

The lych gate, built in 1887, is Grade II listed.

Warburton St Werbergh

Warburton St Werbergh

 

 

The benifice of Warburton was jointly held with Oughtrington, St Peter.